The Great British Archaeoastronomical Megalithic Structure Myth

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Callanish Stones (spanishjohnny72 / Adobe Stock)

The Great British Archaeoastronomical Megalithic Structure Myth

In 1637 AD, John Greaves, the English mathematician, astronomer, antiquarian and professor of geometry at Gresham College in London, England, measured and studied famous ancient monuments in Italy and Egypt including the Great Pyramid. This pre-archaeological investigation project sparked great interest in ancient metrology and the alignments and orientations of ancient cultures, and this new line of research would later be expanded by Isaac Newton and the French Academy.

John Greaves (1602 –1652) was an English mathematician, astronomer and antiquarian. (1650) (Public Domain)

John Greaves (1602 –1652) was an English mathematician, astronomer and antiquarian. (1650) (Public Domain)

From these early quests in search of important prime measurements and alignments embedded in the structures of ancient monuments, came the modern science of archaeoastronomy, which looks for astronomical significance in megalithic stone sites and medieval architecture. Over the last three decades archaeoastronomy, which connects ancient sites with astronomy, has convinced the general public with a passing interest in archaeology and history that ‘all’ ancient monuments were oriented according to occurrences in the sky. However, something else influenced the ancient engineers, something much more down to earth.


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