The Life and Times of Rumi: Sufism and the Golden Age of Islam | Ancient Origins Members Site


The Life and Times of Rumi: Sufism and the Golden Age of Islam

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:  Illustration, Isle of Graia Gulf of Akabah Arabia Petraea

The Life and Times of Rumi: Sufism and the Golden Age of Islam

In this modern age, the poems of the 13th century Persian poet Muhammad Jalal ad-Din Rumi have sold millions of copies, making him one of the most popular poets in the world. Considered a provocative figure, Rumi continued the long tradition of ecstatic seers in the style of ancient Greek’s Sappho. His poems have also been compared to Shakespeare’s for their resonance. Meanwhile, for political theorists and historians, Rumi's writings on tolerance have further value in offering a glimpse of the beliefs and tradition in which Rumi experienced in his lifetime.

Rumi’s poems are the product of his time. He was born at the close of the period said to be the “Golden Age of Islam”, a time where the Islamic world became a major intellectual center for science, education and the arts, embracing Muslims and non-Muslims alike, which gave rise to a lot of inventions and scholars well known to this day.

Artist’s depiction of Rumi, 1890.

Artist’s depiction of Rumi, 1890. (Public Domain)


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