The Great Pyramid Of Giza Enacting The Rite Of Rebirth

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Pyramid in the sand ( Givaga / Adobe Stock)

The Great Pyramid Of Giza Enacting The Rite Of Rebirth

In Egypt, the pharaoh, who was the living incarnation of Horus, the son of Isis and Osiris, would undergo at death a transformation from being the living Horus to being the dead and resurrected Osiris. Pharaoh was, by inheritance, the anointed king-god of his people: in essence he was the equivalent of the Greek Christos, a messiah.

Osiris God Statue - The Egyptian god of resurrection and the afterlife Osiris stands as a statue in a temple in the desert. (Catmando/ Adobe Stock)

Osiris God Statue - The Egyptian god of resurrection and the afterlife Osiris stands as a statue in a temple in the desert. (Catmando/ Adobe Stock)

The word ‘pharaoh’ means literally ‘great house’. Throughout human history dynastic lineages have always been referred to as houses—the house of David is a case in point. This architectural term denotes the idea that the lineage descends from the gods—who reside in temples, and therefore, the origin of the line is divine. In the case of David and Solomon it was the tabernacle and then the Jerusalem temple. In the case of the pharaohs it can only mean the most revered monument in Egyptian history—and the most sacred place in its history: the Great Pyramid. The pyramid is Osiris; therefore the pharaoh, as Osiris’ son Horus, has to be referencing this extraordinary monument as the meaning of his title; and as the anointed Son of God, he is also the master of its liturgy and ritual.


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