Psychic Archaeology Uncovers Lost Structures at Glastonbury

Psychic Archaeology Uncovers Lost Structures at Glastonbury

‘The Company of Avalon’ was a group of monks who allegedly directed excavations at Glastonbury Abbey from behind the scenes, so far behind the scenes in fact from the ‘other side’.  In the early 1900’s an unconventional architect, Frederick Bligh Bond, aided by an army captain, solicited the help of deceased monks, by means of ‘psychic archaeology’ to uncover structures long lost to the naked eye. 

Vision of the Holy Grail by William Morris (1890) Museum and Art Gallery of Birmingham (Public Domain)

Vision of the Holy Grail by William Morris (1890) Museum and Art Gallery of Birmingham (Public Domain)

The Humble Beginnings, Rise and Destruction of Glastonbury

In AD 63 ancient chronicles record that Joseph of Arimathea, the member of the Sanhedrin who had provided the tomb for Christ’s burial 30 years previously, would have arrived from the Holy Land to a location in the southwest of Britain, called Ynis Witrin, and that he had brought along a chalice. Was this the ‘Holy Grail’ used by Jesus during the Last Supper and purportedly the cup which caught the blood from wounds inflicted on Jesus during the crucifixion on Golgotha? About 100 years later, in AD 166 a humble chapel dedicated to St. Mary was built on this location. During the following centuries and also as a result of religious persecution, the small local Christian community was dispersed, and the chapel was deserted. In AD 720 on the same site, in the Celtic Glass Island - so called because it was characterized by a hill that emerged from the surrounding 'glassy' marshes - some Saxon monks, on the orders of King Ine del Wessex, revived and extended the original nucleus of the church.


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